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22 US military suicides per day - US killing.

US new fascism.

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Center for Conscience and war - 22 US military suicides per day - US killing.

US new fascism.

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Pete Linnerooth sitting outside a US army mental health clinic in Baghdad, Iraq, in 2007.

Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.

Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.

Photo Internet/Brock McNabb
Pete Linnerooth sitting outside a US army mental health clinic in Baghdad, Iraq, in 2007.
Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the US 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.
Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.
US Captain who could not escape
Taken from a March 2013 Associated Press article by Sharon Cohen — edited in an anti-war style that has no praise or accepted reasoning for war or military occupation, by Kewe at Kewe.info
US Captain Peter Linnerooth was an Army psychologist who counseled soldiers in Iraq. Hundreds upon hundreds sought his help.
He counseled for nightmares, for insomnia, for the shock of killing another human, for the grief of seeing soldiers killed,
He counseled soldiers that came to him who wanted to end it all.
His Army peers called him 'The Wizard' for his rapport, his heart, his ability to be compassionate, to understand.
He would comfort those sickened, those haunted with the screams of the maimed, haunted by the smell of blood, the visions of death of burning, of men, of women and the many children.
US Captain Peter Linnerooth would hop on helicopters, join US occupation convoys facing mortars, facing roadside bombs.
Mostly he met with the soldiers who came to his small office at US occupation Camp Liberty in Baghdad, Iraq.
Here he would play Motorhead and Iron Maiden often at ear-shattering levels.   Here he would return the soldiers' speech, the expletive, the imprecation, the simple castigations, the favored curse.
A professional Army officer, the Captain knew when to be tough, knew when to be a friend.
A proud dad, his children's drawings and photos were displayed — his pack that he carried around held his newborn daughter's first shoes.
In 2007 US Captain Linnerooth decided he must leave Iraq.
Hearing enough from those he counseled, seeing more than ever he could handle of the constant death and injury that was all around him, he managed to be able to free himself, return to the United States a few months short of his 15-month delegated stay.
Finding a job as a college professor, Peter Linnerooth began a new life, but then began to do what he had done in Iraq. He counseled veterans, especially those who spoke about feelings of suicide.
He wrote about the danger inherent in this professional task, where all was about depression, about anger, about the effects, the severe anxiety, the disorder that came after exposure to killing, to trauma, to the attacks upon another people in all its forms.
His own demons eventually bringing about divorce and then a remarrying.
Early in 2008, the demons conquered.
Peter Linnerooth turned his gun on himself — he was 42.
Brock McNabb places a combat patch on Pete Linnerooth's uniform at their mental health crew office in Baghdad, Iraq, Autumn of 2006.

Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three including Brock McNabb who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.

Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.

Photo Internet/Brock McNabb
Brock McNabb places a combat patch on Pete Linnerooth's uniform at their mental health crew office in Baghdad, Iraq, Autumn of 2006.
In Iraq Peter Linnerooth turned tragedies into moments that sustained those he counseled.
Encouraging the writing of letters to the children of the father who had been killed, telling of all the excellent qualities of the soldier, a whole platoon might find comfort in dealing with the loss and their own grief.
"Captain Linnerooth felt he was putting a Band-Aid over a bullet hole," one of his fellow mental health team, Brock McNabb pointed out:
"It would be, 'I got you to where you can sleep through the night ... but guess what?   You have seven months left in your deployment.'"
Peter Linnerooth — the only trained psychologist in his brigade combat team — was frustrated by what he regarded as the Army's view of mental health.
To him the army viewed mental health as a second-class problem that could be minimized and even overlooked during a period of deployment.
It was during this period that Captain Linnerooth as many other soldiers in the US army began to take an antidepressant drug.
Peter Linnerooth wrote about a female US soldier who had been brought into the clinic with mortal wounds. The US female soldier's Humvee had been struck by an armor-penetrating explosive laid by some Iraq resistance force seeking to free their country of the US occupation.
"I stood at her head and considered her hair, for Christsakes!
The blast had mussed her hair.
Removed her foot, cleaved her abdomen, but mussed her hair.
For whatever reason I looked at it and longed to smooth it back from her forehead.
Like I do for my children.
It was reddish-blond, curly, almost kinky, and in disarray.
I looked around me to see if anyone would notice this gesture, if anyone would mind.
Hell, I don't know what to do in an abattoir of human suffering, it's not my job.
I deal with easy things, like the paranoid, the personality disordered, and those without hope.
All I wanted to do was smooth her hair, perhaps compose her for the next stage of her journey.
But I never did it, and regret it to this day."
A year into the Iraq stay, Brock McNabb says, Peter Linnerooth walked in a doctor's office on the base and said:
"'I can't stand it.   This is too much.   How much more misery and torture are these kids going to go through?'"
Peter Linnerooth as a child with his father David, mother Gayle and sister Mary around the period of 1980. 

His mother Gayle adopted Pete when he was 9½ weeks old.  His mother describes Peter as being a loving little boy who adored animals, talked up a storm at 18 months old and was very sensitive.  

Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three including Brock McNabb who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.

Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.

Photo Internet/Mary Linnerooth Gonzalez
Peter Linnerooth as a child with his father David, mother Gayle and sister Mary around the period of 1980.
His mother Gayle adopted Pete when he was 9½ weeks old.
His mother describes Peter as being a loving little boy who adored animals, talked up a storm at 18 months old and was very sensitive.
Mary Linnerooth Gonzalez, his younger sister states:
"He was disappointed that he couldn't affect the wheels of change. ... I think he was defeated.   He came home burdened."
Amy Linnerooth, Peter Linnerooth's first wife:
"I think it was just kind of like a wall that he put up.
I asked him about that later and he said if he let that guard down, then it would be like a dam flooding and it would just all come out and he couldn't be that way."
There would be jokes about suicide.
Patrick Friman — who was in charge of Peter Linnerooth's doctoral dissertation at the University of Nevada-Reno — speaks of him relating to a mother.
This mother was struggling with her 3-year-old who wouldn't sleep in her own bed, was not yet toilet trained and would refuse to do anything that her mother asked.
"I marveled at how well he described the problem, the solution and the steps that need to be taken to achieve it.
The mother was hanging on his every word.
She couldn't wait to go home to try it."
He wanted to learn how to work with kids and he was just a natural at it.
Amy Linnerooth said her husband seemed like two people:
"It would be like the guy you knew ... then a little thing would set him off.
I remember telling him, 'I just want to blend in with the wallpaper.   I don't want to be in your way.'   It was like walking on eggshells."
Early in 2009 was the first suicide attempt.
At that time Peter Linnerooth nearly died from an overdose of pills.
Peter confided to Brock McNabb over the telephone
"I just hated where my life was going.   Here, I'm arguing with my wife. ...   I want to be normal for my kids.   ... I was tired of being here.'"
Amy Linnerooth says her husband was very remorseful.
"He thought that was a really stupid thing to do to the kids and us."
He seemed so upset with what he had tried to do that she was convinced he would never try to harm himself again.
By late 2009 his marriage with Amy had seemed to have come to its end.
His position in Minnesota in jeopardy, he decided to ask for an extended leave.
Pete Linnerooth's creation for his daughter Mary, a cartoon series for his daughter that features a spider, center, that they call Gigerenzer.

Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three including Brock McNabb who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.

Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.

Photo Internet
Pete Linnerooth's creation for his daughter Mary, a cartoon series for his daughter that features a spider that they call Gigerenzer at the center of this drawing.
Peter took off west to try and start a new life.
At the Santa Cruz County Veterans Center in California the ongoing divorce and separation from his kids weighed.
He would fly to Minnesota often and when in California he would call his children, Jack aged 9, and Whitney aged 6, every night.
he created a cartoon series for his daughter featuring a spider they called Gigerenzer.
He would Skype with his kids, read to his son, even just watch them watch TV.
His work as a veterans' readjustment counselor was helping people and he spoke often at symposiums about the emotional trauma of war.
With Brock McNabb he conducted a suicide prevention class for an Army Reserve unit.
Even as he himself was being treated for his own trauma.
He became more vocal about the strains on military psychologists.
Peter talked to The New York Times and Time.
He told Time magazine in 2010:
"The Army has been criminally negligent."
He was speaking about the army not having enough mental health experts to serve combat veterans.
This putting an ever bigger burden on those who were trying to do the job.
A earlier relationship with Melanie Walsh at Reno, before Peter's first marriage, now blossomed into a new bid for marriage.
Melanie and Peter were married in July 2011.
Bret Moore, another former Army psychologist, joined with him to produce an academic paper about professional burnout.
Bret Moore wanted to make it more academic and less emotional.
Pete Linnerooth and his sister Mary, December 2009.

Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three including Brock McNabb who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.

Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.

Photo Internet/Mary Linnerooth Gonzalez
Pete Linnerooth and his sister Mary, December 2009.
"You could really see the anger," Bret Moore says, noting the paper reflected both Peter's attitude toward the military and his disintegrating personal life.
The paper was published in 2011 in an American Psychological Association journal.
Linnerooth was hired by the Department of Veterans Affairs at Reno where he had moved to be with his new wife.
The work was to counsel veterans struggling with PTSD and substance abuse.
Approaching a two-year deadline to get a state license required by the VA, his old time Iraq buddy Brock McNabb urged Peter to take the test.
Peter would not and so the VA let him go.
"He deteriorated after that and he deteriorated quickly," Melanie says.
At the end of the summer before he killed himself Linnerooth returned home to Minnesota to be with his children.
He did travel back to California for a joyous occasion — the birth of his son, David.
Christmas came around and Peter sent a photos of the infant boy in a green monster outfit to his sister, Mary.
On January 2nd, 2013 after a fight with his wife, he took a gun and killed himself.
Melanie, his wife says:
"He didn't like to burden other people.
He liked to take care of other people.
I don't know anyone who knew how to comfort people like he did.
He was very kind.
He was sincere.
He was generous.
He was patient.
He was forgiving.
It's such a tragedy.
He had the skill.
He genuinely cared, he could have helped so many people.
And now he's gone."
His family and friends gathered on a bitter cold January 2013 day in Minnesota to bid farewell.
On his gravestone is etched the words:
HE SAVED MANY
NOW HE'S HOME.
Grave site of Capt. Peter Linnerooth at Fort Snelling National Cemetery in Minneapolis.

Psychologist Pete Linnerooth was one of three including Brock McNabb who were part of a mental health crew in charge of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division in the Baghdad area of Iraq.

Pete Linnerooth committed suicide by turning a gun upon himself in January of 2013.

Photo AP/Jim Mone
As of 3 June 2012, the Pentagon in the first 155 days of the year gives an army active-duty suicide figure of 154 personnel, compared with 130 in the same period last year.
Something very wrong don't you think
Chapman's coffin

First occupying U.S. soldier killed by resistance forces in Afghanistan 2002

Image: Internet
First occupying U.S. soldier killed by resistance forces in Afghanistan January 4, 2002
US Military Suicides
An American soldier dies every day and a half on average in Iraq or Afghanistan.
Veterans kill themselves at a rate of one every 80 minutes.
More than 6,500 veteran suicides are logged every year — more than the total number of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq combined since those wars began.

A military base 'on the brink'
By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times reporting from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.
December 26, 2011
Mary Coghill Kirkland said she asked her son, 21-year-old Army Spc. Derrick Kirkland, what was wrong as soon as he came back from his first deployment to Iraq in 2008.
24 year old Iraq War Veteran
Kills park ranger before wandering off into the snow to die himself
Could no longer handle the idiocy, the deception, the lies
Mom, I'm a murderer
He had a ready answer: "Mom, I'm a murderer."
He told her how his team had kicked in the door of an Iraqi house and quickly shot a man inside.
With the man lying wounded on the floor, "my son got ordered by his sergeant to stand on his chest to make him bleed out faster," Kirkland said.
"He said, 'We've got to move, and he's got to die before we move.'"
Not long after, Derrick told her, he had fallen asleep on guard duty, awakening as a car was driving through his checkpoint.
So my son shot up the car
He yelled for it to stop, but the family in the car spoke no English.
"So my son shot up the car," she said.
Summing up her son's mental state after that deployment, Kirkland said: "What's a nice word for saying that he was completely [messed] up?"
Kirkland relates the remaining years of her son's life as if reading a script: He was depressed by his wife's request for a divorce.
On a second deployment in Iraq, he was caught putting a gun in his mouth and evacuated on suicide watch to Germany.
There, he tried to overdose on pills.
He was flown back to his home base here in Washington state.
After a brief psychiatric evaluation, he was left alone in his room.
He hanged himself with a cord in his closet.
In the closet, dead
Apparently worried that no one would notice, Spc. Kirkland left a note on the door of the locker in his room.
"In the closet, dead," it said.
Wars have always sent many of their practitioners home with lingering emotional scars, but the growing toll of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts is catching up not only with the U.S. military, but with communities like this.
"It's very much a local issue," said Democratic state Rep. Tina Orwall, who led a hearing in December on how state and local officials can help returning soldiers land on their feet.
Around Joint Base Lewis-McChord, a major staging base for the wars, the working-class suburbs are almost indistinguishable from the base itself.
Towns like Lakewood, DuPont, Spanaway and Parkland are home not only to military families, but to thousands of veterans who over the years have stayed on after their enlistments.
Among them are many with mental health issues.
More than 13% of the Army, which has borne the brunt of the fighting, now meets the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder.
Senior officers point out that today's soldiers are under unique stresses.
Gen. Peter W. Chiarelli said in a report last year:
"At 24 years of age, a soldier, on average, has moved from home, family and friends and has resided in two other states; has traveled the world (deployed); been promoted four times; bought a car and wrecked it; married and had children; has had relationship and financial problems; seen death; is responsible for dozens of soldiers; maintains millions of dollars worth of equipment; and gets paid less than $40,000 a year,"
At Joint Base Lewis-McChord, described by the independent military newspaper Stars and Stripes last year as "the most troubled base in the military," all of these factors have crystallized into what some see as a community-wide crisis.
A local veterans group calls it a "base on the brink."
In a recent series of community meetings, the group warned that the trauma of multiple deployments had begun to show up in troubling numbers outside the base.
Murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving, drug overdoses
The recent reports of suicides — seven confirmed and five under investigation, with a total of 62 since 2002 — parallel those of murders, fights, robberies, domestic violence, drunk driving and drug overdoses.
The local crime wave became apparent as early as 2004, when three elite Army Rangers were among a group of five men who stormed into a Bank of America in Tacoma armed with AK-47s, took over the branch and walked out with $54,011.
Over the last two years, an Iraq veteran pleaded guilty to assault after being accused of waterboarding his 7-year-old foster son in the bathtub.
Another was accused of pouring lighter fluid over his wife and setting her on fire.
One was charged with torturing his 4-year-old daughter for refusing to say her ABCs.
A Stryker Brigade soldier was convicted of the kidnap, torture and rape or attempted rape of two women, one of whom he shocked with cables attached to a car battery.
An Iraq war sergeant was convicted of strangling his wife and hiding her body in a storage bin.
In April, 38-year-old combat medic David Stewart, who had been under treatment for depression, paranoia and sleeplessness, led police on a high-speed chase down Interstate 5 before crashing into a barrier.
As police agents watched, he shot himself in the head
As officers watched, he shot himself in the head. His wife, a nurse, was found in the car with him, also shot to death.
Police later found the body of their 5-year-old son in the family home.
Said Jackie Baleto, who lives nearby:
"My daughter played with the little boy, and even now when they're playing outside, the kids are screaming, 'Jordan lived in there. Jordan died in there.' So it affects everybody, even the kids."
Lakewood Police Chief Bret Farrar:
"I can tell you that in the last two years, we have had 24 instances in which we contacted soldiers who were armed with weapons."
"We've had intimidation, stalking with a weapon, aggravated assault, domestic violence, drive-bys."
The military is redoubling efforts to provide suicide hotlines and counseling.
The flagship effort is the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program, designed to make troops healthy and resilient before they go to war. Col. Michael Brobeck, commands the 555th Engineer Brigade at Lewis-McChord, about a fourth of whom are currently in Afghanistan:
"We teach them about patience, about maturity, about how it's OK to have issues, because everybody has issues."
The local Madigan Army Medical Center this year opened a $52-million "warrior transition" barracks for 408 wounded or stressed soldiers and their families.
The center has seen a big increase in behavioral health visits — more than 118,000 this year.
Brobeck thinks all this is helping.
Over the last two years, he said, the number of his soldiers exhibiting an extremely high risk of mental health problems has declined.
"Out of 4,000 [troops] when I started doing it about two years ago, we were in the 70s. Now I'm down in the 50s or low 60s."
Yet in the tough warrior culture of Lewis-McChord, some say soldiers who go to counseling or say they aren't emotionally prepared to go back to war can be humiliated or ignored.
As soon as he walked in the door they called him a coward
Kirkland, when he returned to Lewis-McChord after his first two suicide attempts, was set upon by the unit's acting first sergeant, said Kevin Baker, who served with Kirkland in Iraq and was in the office that day.
"As soon as he walked in the door, [one of the sergeants] called him a coward" and worse, recalled Baker, who recently left the Army.
Ashley Joppa-Hagemann of Yelm, Wash., a mother of two young children, said her husband, 25-year-old Staff Sgt. Jared Hagemann, begged Army commanders this year not to have to return for what she said would be a ninth deployment overseas.
There was just hatred in his eyes
She said she went herself to the base commander, all to no avail.
"He was always drinking, and he became very violent and aggressive.
There was just hatred in his eyes."
Joppa-Hagemann went to court on June 27 to get a restraining order to keep her husband away from her and the children, telling the court that her husband had threatened to kill himself "and take as many folks down with him as possible."
The order couldn't be served, as it turned out.
Hagemann's body was found the next day in a training field at Lewis-McChord, shot through the head.
"We told them.
We told everybody there was something wrong."
"Nobody would listen."
San Diego naval hospital testing unusual PTSD treatment
Psychic trauma and its aftermath
Soldiers' brains bear scars of emotional wounds
Ruling ordering better VA mental health treatment is withdrawn
I will never quit on life
Over my dead body
Demons in your mind
Copyright 2011 Los Angeles Times
Baghdad Iraq street 2006.

Photo SGT Brian Kerrigan
Baghdad Iraq street 2006.
Photo: Internet/SGT Brian Kerrigan
US bombing Baghdad Iraq, March 21 2003.

Photo Reuters/Goran Tomasevic
US bombing Baghdad, March 21 2003
UK bombing Basra Iraq, March 29 2003.

Photo Reuters/Goran Tomasevic
UK bombing Basra Iraq, March 29 2003
Shedding light on Bush, Cheney, Blair, and most of the US Senate an Congress and UK Labour and Conservative Parliamentarians who vote for and fund these overt and covert wars is always welcome.
The article below 'The Last Letter' by US veteran Tomas Young, wounded in Iraq, paralyzed in an Iraq resistant ambush in 2004 in Sadr City, is a telling indictment of those who in the West caused the death, the maiming, the misery, at least as far as George Bush and Cheney.
If it should be his will that Tomas Young decides to leave this planet so be it.
If it is not, let us hope Tomas Young may yet have more things to do here.
Ultimately the blame has to fall upon the nineteen and twenty year olds, those who like Tomas Young in their foolishness believed.
Young people who, supported by much of the citizenry of the United States and United Kingdom, placed their lives and bodies into jeopardy in supporting the carnage of fire and death that took place in Iraq — a country that had done nothing to the United States or the United Kingdom.
Misguided young but no less culpable individuals who as I write now a new crop stare at computer screens and press buttons when commanded to kill.
Because that is what these young one's who are taken up, are paid to do:  kill and maim.
911
Tomas Young has not yet been able to accept that 911 itself was a huge subterfuge.
Few have yet really come to accept that 911 was not caused by a few Saudi pilots, but caused by invidious planning, careful strategy that had gone back years before 911 to bring the world to where it is today.
Planning that required Bush to be ordained President rather than elected, as the US Supreme Court set upon themselves, knowingly or not, to see a million dead in iraq
Countless more people and animals to be destroyed, and indeed countless more injured and pemanently maimed.
But Iraq is only one of the many places where death and injury has been caused by the US and UK.
All the dead and injured in Afghanistan
All the dead and injured everywhere where America and the UK have placed their feet.
Vietnam — 3 million people killed or is it 4 million?
Ah!   The UK did not officially participate in that war you might say.
A war that has seen the effects of agent orange and varied toxic chemical experiments still producing malformed births and people today.
With Iraq in the city of Fallujah and elsewhere Depleted Uranium.
How far back do we go?
The slaughter of a million North Koreans by air attack by the US.
All the death and injury attempted and mostly successful completed in Central and South America, in Africa, in the countries of South-East Asia that I have not mentioned, in the bombings of Yugoslavia.
Where should we stop?
Here!
You know this that is written.   I know this.   So does Tomas Young who now seeks to end his life in his human body and to indict Bush and Cheney before he leaves.
So his letter is given here.
The world does continue, and it is for the world's young that they might have a chance to know.
For the young are the ones who will have to stop this.
We, I, could not!
Kewe
       Children living lives with depleted uranium      
       US Veterans becoming sick with DU      
           BBC investigation reveals the US and UK military have continued to use depleted uranium weapons despite warnings from scientists that it poses a potential long-term cancer risk   
       Depleted Uranium — its use in Afghanistan, Iraq, Balkans      
       Photos of Iraq children being born deformed      
>
The Blair legacy — Part I
I looked through to the Mosul hotel lounge where the entire staff from the owner/Manager to the kitchen boy stool huddled around the television aware of nothing but the Colin Powell address to the U.N. making it clear that an attack on Iraq was imminent
Baroness Symons agreed that it would be difficult to justify British companies losing out in Iraq in that way
The Foreign Office invited BP in on 6 November 2002 to talk about opportunities in Iraq “post regime change”
Destruction and civilian victims of Anglo-American aggression
The criteria for criminal sociopaths require an ongoing disregard for the rights of others
60% of the people killed in the assault of Fallujah were women children and elderly

The Last Letter
A Message to George W. Bush and Dick Cheney From a Dying Veteran
To: George W. Bush and Dick Cheney
From: Tomas Young
I write this letter on the 10th anniversary of the Iraq War on behalf of my fellow Iraq War veterans.
Tomas Young tries to rest because his body keeps having involuntary rigid muscle contraction accompanied by pain, at his Kansas City home in 2007.

US veteran wounded in Iraq paralyzed in an Iraq resistant ambush in 2004 in Sadr City.

Photo: Allison Long/The Kansas City Star
Tomas Young tries to lie on the bed, his body keeps having involuntary rigid muscle contraction accompanied by pain.
At his Kansas City home in 2007.
Allison Long/The Kansas City Star
Image inserted by Kewe.info
I write this letter on behalf of the 4,488 soldiers and Marines who died in Iraq.
I write this letter on behalf of the hundreds of thousands of veterans who have been wounded and on behalf of those whose wounds, physical and psychological, have destroyed their lives.
I am one of those gravely wounded.
I was paralyzed in an insurgent ambush in 2004 in Sadr City.
My life is coming to an end.
I am living under hospice care.
I write this letter on behalf of husbands and wives who have lost spouses, on behalf of children who have lost a parent, on behalf of the fathers and mothers who have lost sons and daughters and on behalf of those who care for the many thousands of my fellow veterans who have brain injuries.
I write this letter on behalf of those veterans whose trauma and self-revulsion for what they have witnessed, endured and done in Iraq have led to suicide and on behalf of the active-duty soldiers and Marines who commit, on average, a suicide a day.
I write this letter on behalf of the some 1 million Iraqi dead and on behalf of the countless Iraqi wounded.
I write this letter on behalf of us all—the human detritus your war has left behind, those who will spend their lives in unending pain and grief.
You may evade justice but in our eyes you are each guilty of egregious war crimes, of plunder and, finally, of murder, including the murder of thousands of young Americans — my fellow veterans — whose future you stole.
I write to you, Mr. Bush and Mr. Cheney. not because I think you grasp the terrible human and moral consequences of your lies, manipulation and thirst for wealth and power.
Tomas Young tries to rest because his body keeps having involuntary rigid muscle contraction accompanied by pain, at his Kansas City home in 2007.

US veteran wounded in Iraq paralyzed in an Iraq resistant ambush in 2004 in Sadr City.

Photo: Allison Long/The Kansas City Star
Tomas Young tries to lie on the bed, his body keeps having involuntary rigid muscle contraction accompanied by pain.
At his Kansas City home in 2007.
Allison Long/The Kansas City Star
Image inserted by Kewe.info
I write because, before my own death I want to make it clear that I, and hundreds of thousands of my fellow veterans, along with millions of my fellow citizens, along with hundreds of millions more in Iraq and the Middle East, know fully who you are and what you have done.
You may evade justice but in our eyes you are each guilty of egregious war crimes, of plunder and, finally, of murder, including the murder of thousands of young Americans—my fellow veterans—whose future you stole.
Your positions of authority, your millions of dollars of personal wealth, your public relations consultants, your privilege and your power cannot mask the hollowness of your character.
Dodged the draft and went AWOL
You sent us to fight and die in Iraq after you, Mr. Cheney, dodged the draft in Vietnam, and you, Mr. Bush, went AWOL from your National Guard unit.
Your cowardice and selfishness were established decades ago.
Thomas Young and his wife Claudia Cuellar.

US veteran wounded in Iraq paralyzed in an Iraq resistant ambush in 2004 in Sadr City.

Photo: claudia cuellar
Thomas Young and his wife Claudia Cuellar.
At his Kansas City home in 2007.
You were not willing to risk yourselves for our nation but you sent hundreds of thousands of young men and women to be sacrificed in a senseless war with no more thought than it takes to put out the garbage.
I joined the Army two days after the 9/11 attacks.
I joined the Army because our country had been attacked.
I wanted to strike back at those who had killed some 3,000 of my fellow citizens.
I did not join the Army to go to Iraq, a country that had no part in the September 2001 attacks and did not pose a threat to its neighbors, much less to the United States.
A soldier abetting your idiocy and your crimes
I did not join the Army to “liberate” Iraqis or to shut down mythical weapons-of-mass-destruction facilities or to implant what you cynically called “democracy” in Baghdad and the Middle East.
I did not join the Army to rebuild Iraq, which at the time you told us could be paid for by Iraq’s oil revenues.
Instead, this war has cost the United States over $3 trillion.
I especially did not join the Army to carry out pre-emptive war.
Pre-emptive war is illegal under international law.
And as a soldier in Iraq I was, I now know, abetting your idiocy and your crimes.
Tomas Young on the computer.

US veteran wounded in Iraq paralyzed in an Iraq resistant ambush in 2004 in Sadr City.

Photo: Internet
Tomas Young on the computer.

Internet image inserted by Kewe.info
The Iraq War is the largest strategic blunder in U.S. history.   It obliterated the balance of power in the Middle East.
It installed a corrupt and brutal pro-Iranian government in Baghdad, one cemented in power through the use of torture, death squads and terror.
And it has left Iran as the dominant force in the region.
On every level—moral, strategic, military and economic—Iraq was a failure.
911
And it was you, Mr. Bush and Mr. Cheney, who started this war.
It is you who should pay the consequences.
I would not be writing this letter if I had been wounded fighting in Afghanistan against those forces that carried out the attacks of 9/11.
Had I been wounded there I would still be miserable because of my physical deterioration and imminent death, but I would at least have the comfort of knowing that my injuries were a consequence of my own decision to defend the country I love.
I would not have to lie in my bed, my body filled with painkillers, my life ebbing away, and deal with the fact that hundreds of thousands of human beings, including children, including myself, were sacrificed by you for little more than the greed of oil companies, for your alliance with the oil sheiks in Saudi Arabia, and your insane visions of empire.
I have, like many other disabled veterans, suffered from the inadequate and often inept care provided by the Veterans Administration.
Thomas Young Christmas 2012.

US veteran wounded in Iraq paralyzed in an Iraq resistant ambush in 2004 in Sadr City.

Photo: claudia cuellar
Thomas Young and his wife Claudia Cuellar.
Christmas 2012.
I have, like many other disabled veterans, come to realize that our mental and physical wounds are of no interest to you, perhaps of no interest to any politician.
Abandoned
We were used.
We were betrayed.
And we have been abandoned.
You, Mr. Bush, make much pretense of being a Christian.
But isn’t lying a sin?
Isn’t murder a sin?
Aren’t theft and selfish ambition sins?
I am not a Christian.
But I believe in the Christian ideal.
I believe that what you do to the least of your brothers you finally do to yourself, to your own soul.
My day of reckoning is upon me.
Yours will come.
I hope you will be put on trial.
But mostly I hope, for your sakes, that you find the moral courage to face what you have done to me and to many, many others who deserved to live.
I hope that before your time on earth ends, as mine is now ending, you will find the strength of character to stand before the American public and the world, and in particular the Iraqi people, and beg for forgiveness.
To read Chris Hedges’ recent interview with Tomas Young, click here.
Vietnam veteran and peace activist Ron Kovic on what it’s like to be wounded in war, click here.
© 2013 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.
George Bush and Dick Cheney 911 conspirators.

George Bush and Dick Cheney in 2006

Photo Kevin Lamarque/Reuters
US soldiers committing suicide Jason Scheuerman

“Jason desperately needed a second opinion after his encounter with the Army psychologist,” Chris Scheuerman told members of the Armed Services Committee’s Military Personnel Subcommittee.


Photo: Chris Scheuerman

Jason Scheuerman
“Jason desperately needed a second opinion after his encounter with the Army psychologist,” Chris Scheuerman told members of the Armed Services Committee’s Military Personnel Subcommittee.
“The army did offer him that option, but at his own expense.
“How is a PFC (private first class) in the middle of Iraq supposed to get to a civilian mental health care provider at his own expense?”
“I believe a soldier should be afforded the opportunity to a second opinion via teleconference with a civilian mental health care provider of their own choice.”
I have already said that I am not involved in the 11 September attacks in the United States.
As a Muslim I try my best to avoid telling a lie.
I had no knowledge of these attacks, nor do I consider the killing of innocent women, children and other humans as an appreciable act.
Islam strictly forbids causing harm to innocent women, children, and other people.
Such a practice is forbidden ever in the course of a battle.
Osama bin Laden
Suicides US military
Psychological Price of Fighting for Empire — combat operation in US occupation wars
Colonel Steven Braverman, head of the Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, FORT HOOD Texas, USA

Suicides US army military.

Psychological price of occupation wars.

The Psychological Price of Fighting for Empire — combat operation in US occupation wars

Army Sgt. Douglas Hale Jr., 26, was one of the most recent Fort Hood suicides.

On July, 6, 2010, Glenda Moss received this text message from Hale, her son: “i love u mom im so sorry i hope u and the family and god can forgive me.”

Her son had tried to kill himself in May.

She feared he might try again.

She immediately called the Army and then drove the 90 minutes from her home in King, Texas, to the base.

It was too late.

Hale had walked into a restaurant across Highway 190 from Fort Hood, asked to use the bathroom, locked the door and shot himself in the head with a newly purchased handgun, according to a police report.

He was removed from life support a few days later.

Moss knew her son was very troubled.

When his second combat tour to Iraq ended in 2007 after 15 months, he was diagnosed with PTSD and severe depression, began drinking heavily, saw his marriage disintegrate and, finally, left the base without permission last year.

He was brought back to Fort Hood in May after being taken into custody by police in King for being absent without leave, his mother said.

He attempted suicide in his barracks that month.

The Army sent him to a psychiatric hospital in Denton, Texas.

Army doctors told him “we don’t have enough people here (at Fort Hood) to help you,” his mother recalls....

Photo USA TODAY
Army Sgt. Douglas Hale Jr., 26, was one of the most recent Fort Hood suicides.
On July, 6, 2010, Glenda Moss received this text message from Hale, her son: “i love u mom im so sorry i hope u and the family and god can forgive me.”
Her son had tried to kill himself in May.
She feared he might try again.
She immediately called the Army and then drove the 90 minutes from her home in King, Texas, to the base.
It was too late.
Hale had walked into a restaurant across Highway 190 from Fort Hood, asked to use the bathroom, locked the door and shot himself in the head with a newly purchased handgun, according to a police report.
He was removed from life support a few days later.
Moss knew her son was very troubled.
When his second combat tour to Iraq ended in 2007 after 15 months, he was diagnosed with PTSD and severe depression, began drinking heavily, saw his marriage disintegrate and, finally, left the base without permission last year.
He was brought back to Fort Hood in May after being taken into custody by police in King for being absent without leave, his mother said.
He attempted suicide in his barracks that month.
The Army sent him to a psychiatric hospital in Denton, Texas.
Army doctors told him “we don’t have enough people here (at Fort Hood) to help you,” his mother recalls....
Psychological Price of Fighting for Empire
click here
It's all a part of the Illuminati plan — their game!
The wish is for people to be killed!
US service personnel, Afghanistan and Pakistan Taliban and Mujahideen, Afghanistan and Pakistan non-combative civilians, its all the same to the Illuminati, and those who feed off their doings!
Mass chaos is the plan — brought on by the Illuminati themselves, or by those who seek to rid their countries of US and other occupation, chaos is chaos, it matters not!
It all works!
It all achieves the intended goal!
Kewe
 
But in the end all the occupiers are going under
Afghanistan people torch US embassy vehicles after deadly crash in Kabul.
An Afghanistan vehicle was trying to get into the main road when the two foreign occupation vehicles hit it and killed all four Afghanistan occupants
People throw stones and chant 'Death to Karzai' in reference to Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president.
As casualties in Afghanistan rise, US Army suicides, drug use set new records
The US army placed the suicides in a broader context of dangerous behavior among soldiers, including rampant drug use, drunk driving and violent crime.
“We need to create a media ‘shield’ law with teeth and substance that creates an effective federal privilege for communications between a journalist and her sources, preventing the government from compelling testimony from the journalist and to protect the documents, records and other information created by the journalist and the actual communications between the journalist and her sources.”
Chelsea Manning Proposes Bill from Prison to Protect Journalists and Free Speech.

Former Bradley Manning now Chelsea Manning proposes a model bill to increase government transparency—from the jail cell she inhabits for exposing government crimes. 

Photo: theantimedia.org
TheAntiMedia.org   click image for story
Another most disgusting aspect of US life is the trial of hero Bradley Manning, now Chelsea Manning.

Hundreds of Thousands of US Government Employees had access to the US military's classified network of terror and deceit.

Yet only one youngster had any thought of letting the world view this criminality.

Mass crimes against humanity - unspeakable grief and horror committed by supposedly a sane country.

Hundreds of millions turning their heads away because they do not want to see, feel, or hear the blood dripping onto their soul.

Image: Internet
Another most disgusting aspect of US life is the trial of hero Bradley Manning, now Chelsea Manning.
Hundreds of Thousands of US Government Employees had access to the US military's classified network of terror and deceit.
Yet
only one youngster had any thought of letting the world view this criminality.
Mass crimes against humanity — unspeakable grief and horror committed by supposedly a sane country.
Hundreds of millions turning their heads away because they do not want to see, feel, or hear the blood dripping onto their soul.
Kewe
Free the Wikileaks hero
Hail all those who seek to open Illuminati treasured secrecy
What great courage this man, this young man, has!
A great hero of his generation!
What great tribute we pay to those who break with Illuminati authority!
How foul those who imprison this young man!
How I pray they will be brought to account for their traitorous action!
Kewe
Purple Heart For Moral Convictions
Pain so deep it cries a silent weep
Camouflaged in fear afraid to speak
In desperate hope a wounded heart revealed
In Bradley Manning's courageous light no longer concealed
Bradley Manning's heroic fight
click here
Chelsea Manning Support Network
click here
52 innocents killed by US NATO
air strikes Afghanistan
34 innocents injured by US NATO
air strikes Afghanistan
Trapped Children and families, US inhumane terrorists mercilessly took their lives by dropping bombs from helicopters on the houses and surrounding areas.
Scores of innocent lives were taken by Western Nations, NATO US bombing, including the families of Pir Mohammad, Hajji Habeebullah, Faiz Kaka and several more children and women.
6:00 pm local time, as many as 40 innocent non-combatant civilians were martyred and 34 more were seriously injured in Rigi area of Sngin, Helmand.
The deadliest incident occurred while several dozens defenseless villagers including children and women, fearing the US savage invaders’ air strikes, gathered in Hajji Mohammad Husain house.
 
Fort Hood Massacre — Mind Control
Among these “experiments” conducted on US Soldiers by their government, and according to FSB files was a “research specialty” of Major Hasan’s.
One was one called Radio Hypnotic Intracerebral Control Electronic Dissolution of Memory (RHIC-EDOM).
Pioneered for the US Military in the 1960’s, New York University Professor J. Anthony Deutsch:
“Indicated that the mind is a transmitter and if too much information is received, like too many vehicles on a crowded freeway, the brain ceases to transmit.
The Professor indicated that an excess of acetyl choline in the brain can interfere with the memory process and control.
He indicated excess amounts of acetyl choline can be artificially produced, through both the administration of drugs or through the use of radio waves.
The process is called Electronic Dissolution of Memory (EDOM).
The memory transmission can be stopped for as long as the radio signal continues.”
From Western propaganda news media reports on this massacre
click here
Friday, July 30, 2004. Page 112.
By Chris Floyd
America calls its soldiers who fought in World War II "the greatest generation."
They are hymned by Hollywood, celebrated by publishers and politicians, hailed at every turn.
Heroes from lost golden age
And for their troubled descendants, whose military misadventures stretch from My Lai to Abu Ghraib, the clean-limbed victors of the "last good war" do indeed shine out like heroes from a lost golden age.
Yet despite the vast tonnage of celluloid and printer's ink devoted to their praise, what is perhaps the truest, highest measure of their worth has been almost universally neglected.
And what is this hidden glory, which does more honor to the people of the United States than every single military action ordered by their corruption-riddled leaders during the past 50 years?
It's the fact that in the midst of history's most vicious, all-devouring, inhuman war, only about 15 percent of U.S. soldiers on the battlefield actually tried to kill anyone.
Never fired their weapons
In-depth studies by the U.S. Army after the war showed that between 80 percent and 85 percent of the greatest generation never fired their weapons at an exposed enemy in combat, military psychologist Lieutenant Colonel Dave Grossman reports in Christianity Today.
Many times they had the chance, but could not bring themselves to do it.
They either withheld their fire altogether or else shot into the air, to the side, anywhere but at the fellow human beings — their blood kin in biology, mind and mortality — facing them across the line.
This reluctance is even more remarkable given the incessant demonization of the enemy by the top brass, especially in the Pacific, where the Japanese — soldiers and civilians — were routinely portrayed by military propaganda as simian, subhuman creatures fit only for extermination.
Yet even with official license given to the most virulent prejudice, even with the sanction of a just cause (self-defense against aggression), even with the incitements of mortal fear, of grief and anger over slain comrades, even with all the moral chaos endemic to warfare, U.S. soldiers killed only with the greatest reluctance, in the direst extremity.
These were not stripped-down brains with cauterized souls
These were not "warriors," bloodthirsty automatons with stripped-down brains and cauterized souls, slavering in Pavlovian fury at the bell-clap of command.  No, they were real men, willing, as Grossman notes, to stand up for a cause, even die for it, but not willing, in the end, to transgress the natural law (implanted by God or evolution, take your pick) that says: Do not kill your own kind — and every person of every race and nation is your own kind.
You would think that this apotheosis of human transcendence, achieved, in the best democratic fashion, by ordinary conscripts — farmboys and dock workers, factory hands, bank clerks, guitar players, teachers, cab drivers, hobos, card sharks, college men — would have been inscribed on plates of gold and fixed to the walls of the Capitol for all time, a blazon of national greatness.
Just think of it: Soldiers who hated to kill, who went out of their way to avoid killing or even firing their weapons, who held on to their essential humanity in the face of the severest provocations — and yet still won battle after battle, marching to victory in history's greatest war.
Break the next generation of recruits
But far from celebrating this example of genuine glory, the military brass were horrified at the low "firing rates" and anemic "kill ratios" of U.S. soldiery.  They immediately set about trying to break the next generation of recruits of their natural resistance to slaughtering their own kind.
Incorporating the latest techniques for psychological manipulation, new training programs were designed to brutalize the mind and habituate soldiers to the idea of killing automatically, by reflex, without the intervention of any of those "inefficient" scruples displayed by their illustrious predecessors.
And it worked.
The dehumanization process led to a steady rise in firing rates for U.S. soldiers during subsequent conflicts.
In the Korean War, 55 percent were ready to pump hot lead into enemy flesh.
And by the time the greatest generation's own children took the field, in Vietnam, the willingness to slaughter was almost total: 95 percent of combat troops there fired with the intent to kill.
Today, in the quagmire of occupied Iraq, the brutalizing beat goes on.
"Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill, it's like it pounds in my brain," a U.S. soldier told the Los Angeles Times last week.
Another shrugged at the sight of freshly killed bodies.
"It doesn't bother me at all," he said. "I'm a warrior."
Said a third: "We talk about killing all the time.  I never used to be this way ... but it's like I can't stop.
I'm worried what I'll be like when I get home."
Now high rates of suicide, mental damage and emotional torment
A few military officials are beginning to worry, too, noting the high rates of suicide, mental damage and emotional torment among combat veterans.
But the warlords of the White House — notorious battlefield shirkers who prefer to do their killing by remote control — have little regard for the cannon fodder they churn through in their quest for dominance and loot.
"Training's intent is to re-create battle, to make it an automatic behavior among soldiers," said Colonel Thomas Burke, Pentagon director of mental health policy.
Any efforts to mitigate the moral schizophrenia induced by this training would undermine "effectiveness in battle," he added.
Yet strangely enough, this "warrior ethos" has singularly failed to produce the kind of lasting victories won by those 15-percenters of yore.
Could it be that the systematic degradation of natural morality and common human feeling — especially in the service of dubious ends — is not actually the best way to achieve national greatness?
Annotations
Enemy Contact. Kill 'em, kill 'em
Los Angeles Times, July 18, 2004
Trained to Kill
Christianity Today, Aug. 10, 1998
In Anbar Province, Change of Course Rankles Many Soldiers
Knight-Ridder, July 20, 2004
© Copyright 2004, The Moscow Times.   All Rights Reserved.
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq Vietnam

Take In A Deep Breath America
 
As far as suicides among active duty soldiers
and veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are concerned,
we in America have just seen the tip of the iceberg.
Two tours will be twice the chance of suicide.
Three tours will be tripple the chance of suicide.
Four tours will be four times the chance of suicide.
These soldiers will be deleted by this country like
unwanted e-mails.
Why?
Because the American people do not support the troops.
Nobody wants to do the math.
Take in a deep breath America,
the wars are coming home to the stuffed closets of your
mind.
When you fall asleep at the wheel,
people die in your neighborhood.
Eventually,
they may die in your own home.
When I was in Vietnam toward the end of the war,
this is what I saw.
Blood on my hands,
brains in my lap.

Photo and words: Mike Hastie
U.S. Army Medic
Vietnam 1970-71
February 9, 2009

Take In A Deep Breath America!
As far as suicides among active duty soldiers and veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are concerned, we in America have just seen the tip of the iceberg.
Three tours will be tripple the chance of suicide.
Four tours will be four times the chance of suicide.
Soldiers deleted like unwanted e-mails.
Take in a deep breath America, the wars are coming home to the stuffed closets of your mind.
When I was in Vietnam toward the end of the war, this is what I saw.
Blood on my hands, brains in my lap.
Mike Hastie
U.S. Army Medic
Vietnam 1970-71
February 9, 2009
February 11, 2009
Incidence of suicides among war veterans is increasing.
According to an US Army report, the numbers who committed suicide in January could be as high as 24, the highest monthly total since the Army began collecting data on suicides.
January's suicide total may be more than the number of soldiers killed in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan during the month.
Suicide Epidemic Among Veterans
A CBS News Investigation Uncovers A Suicide Rate For Veterans Twice That Of Other Americans
NEW YORK, Nov. 13, 2007
Marine Reservist Jeff Lucey with his parents. 

Photo: (CBS)
Marine Reservist Jeff Lucey with his parents.
(CBS)  They are the casualties of wars you don’t often hear about — soldiers who die of self-inflicted wounds.   Little is known about the true scope of suicides among those who have served in the military.
But a five-month CBS News investigation discovered data that shows a startling rate of suicide, what some call a hidden epidemic, Chief Investigative Reporter Armen Keteyian reports exclusively.
“I just felt like this silent scream inside of me,” said Jessica Harrell, the sister of a soldier who took his own life.
"I opened up the door and there he was," recalled Mike Bowman, the father of an Army reservist.
"I saw the hose double looped around his neck,” said Kevin Lucey, another military father.
"He was gone,” said Mia Sagahon, whose soldier boyfriend committed suicide.
Keteyian spoke with the families of five former soldiers who each served in Iraq — only to die battling an enemy they could not conquer.   Their loved ones are now speaking out in their names.
They survived the hell that's Iraq and then they come home only to lose their life.
Twenty-three-year-old Marine Reservist Jeff Lucey hanged himself with a garden hose in the cellar of this parents’ home — where his father, Kevin, found him.
"There's a crisis going on and people are just turning the other way,” Kevin Lucey said.
Kim and Mike Bowman’s son Tim was an Army reservist who patrolled one of the most dangerous places in Baghdad, known as Airport Road.
"His eyes when he came back were just dead.   The light wasn't there anymore," Kim Bowman said.
Eight months later, on Thanksgiving Day, Tim shot himself.   He was 23.
Diana Henderson’s son, Derek, served three tours of duty in Iraq.   He died jumping off a bridge at 27.
"Going to that morgue and seeing my baby ... my life will never be the same," she said.
Beyond the individual loss, it turns out little information exists about how widespread suicides are among these who have served in the military.
There have been some studies, but no one has ever counted the numbers nationwide.
"Nobody wants to tally it up in the form of a government total," Bowman said.
Why do the families think that is?
"Because they don't want the true numbers of casualties to really be known," Lucey said.
Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., is a member of the Veterans Affairs Committee.
"If you're just looking at the overall number of veterans themselves who've committed suicide, we have not been able to get the numbers,” Murray said. CBS News’ investigative unit wanted the numbers, so it submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the Department of Defense asking for the numbers of suicides among all service members for the past 12 years.
Four months later, they sent CBS News a document, showing that between 1995 and 2007, there were almost 2,200 suicides.
Now that their son Jeff is gone, Kevin and Joyce Lucey are speaking out about his suicide.

Photo: (CBS)
Now that their son Jeff is gone, Kevin and Joyce Lucey are speaking out about his suicide.
That’s 188 last year alone.   But these numbers included only “active duty” soldiers.
CBS News went to the Department of Veterans Affairs, where Dr. Ira Katz is head of mental health.
"There is no epidemic in suicide in the VA, but suicide is a major problem," he said.
Why hasn't the VA done a national study seeking national data on how many veterans have committed suicide in this country?
"That research is ongoing,” he said.
So CBS News did an investigation — asking all 50 states for their suicide data, based on death records, for veterans and non-veterans, dating back to 1995.
Forty-five states sent what turned out to be a mountain of information.
And what it revealed was stunning.
In 2005, for example, in just those 45 states, there were at least 6,256 suicides among those who served in the armed forces.
That’s 120 each and every week, in just one year.
Dr. Steve Rathbun is the acting head of the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Department at the University of Georgia.   CBS News asked him to run a detailed analysis of the raw numbers that we obtained from state authorities for 2004 and 2005.
It found that veterans were more than twice as likely to commit suicide in 2005 than non-vets.
(Veterans committed suicide at the rate of between 18.7 to 20.8 per 100,000, compared to other Americans, who did so at the rate of 8.9 per 100,000.)
One age group stood out.   Veterans aged 20 through 24, those who have served during the war on terror.
They had the highest suicide rate among all veterans, estimated between two and four times higher than civilians the same age.
(The suicide rate for non-veterans is 8.3 per 100,000, while the rate for veterans was found to be between 22.9 and 31.9 per 100,000.)
"Wow! Those are devastating," said Paul Sullivan, a former VA analyst who is now an advocate for veterans rights from the group Veterans For Common Sense. "Those numbers clearly show an epidemic of mental health problems," he said.
“We are determined to decrease veteran suicides," Dr. Katz said.
“One hundred and twenty a week.   Is that a problem?” Keteyian asked.
“You bet it’s a problem,” he said.
Is it an epidemic?
“Suicide in America is an epidemic, and that includes veterans,” Katz said.
Sen. Murray said the numbers CBS News uncovered are significant: “These statistics tell me we've really failed people that served our country."
Do these numbers serve as a wake-up call for this country?
“If these numbers don't wake up this country, nothing will,” she said.
“We each have a responsibility to the men and women who serve us aren't lost when they come home."

An update: The chairman of the Senate Veterans' Affairs Committee, Sen. Daniel Akaka, D-Hawaii, responded to the CBS News story Tuesday.
“The report that the rate of suicide among veterans is double that of the general population is deeply troubling and simply unacceptable.
I am especially concerned that so many young veterans appear to be taking their own lives.
For too many veterans, returning home from battle does not bring an end to conflict.
There is no question that action is needed."
©MMVII, CBS Interactive Inc.   All Rights Reserved.
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq Vietnam

Republican National Convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul in August 2008, when Iraq Veterans Against The War marched in protest against the war.

There were several IVAW members who broke down and expressed their grief.

Betrayal — The Lethal Injection
 
I believe the self-inflicted destructive force behind PTSD, is a silent enemy called betrayal.

It is so insidious and pervasive, that it has the character of a bounty hunter.

Betrayal by one's own government, based on lies to justify going to war, is a vicious preying upon those who do not know.

It totally dismantles the victim's belief system.

The word, 'Trust', sinks to the bottom of the mind.

And, well too often, this profound psychological wound leads to suicide.
 
When the survivor returns from years of mental exile, to finally take the witness stand, he or she often speaks with the artless skill of a severly abused child who has just blurted out some blatant fact of honesty.

It is the kind of honesty that catches people off guard, leaving them speechless.

The survivor exposes truth with such simplistic detail that becomes an indictment against all who had knowledge of war's real criminal intent.

The survivor's testimony can be so compelling it reveals the ultimate evidence: Lying Is The Most Powerful Weapon In War.
 
I was so filled with rage after returning from Vietnam that for the next twenty years I wanted to take every political hawk in America, and rub their faces in the reality of the Vietnam War, just like someone would rub a puppy's nose in the carpet after it wet on the floor.

The only difference is, the wet area on the carpet would be the blood of American teenage boys.

I would be brutally betrayed in Vietnam, and later would returned to an unfamiliar home in a coffin draped with deceit.

Deception so the corporate Godfathers of our country could fill their greedy coffers with enormous war profits.

Once I understood this untouchable truth, I understood the lies.

I did not serve for the cause of freedom — I served Big Business Banking in America for the cause of profit.

Forty years ago before I entered the U.S. military, if someone had told me what I have just written these sentences, I would have told them they were a damn liar, and unpatriotic.

That was forty years ago, before I ever undetstood.

Photo and words: Mike Hastie
U.S. Army Medic
Vietnam 1970-71
February 13, 2009
Republican National Convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul in August 2008, when Iraq Veterans Against The War marched in protest against the war.
There were several IVAW members who broke down and expressed their grief.
Betrayal — The Lethal Injection
I believe the self-inflicted destructive force behind PTSD, is a silent enemy called betrayal.
It is so insidious and pervasive, that it has the character of a bounty hunter.
Betrayal by one's own government, based on lies to justify going to war, is a vicious preying upon those who do not know.
It totally dismantles the victim's belief system.
The word, 'Trust', sinks to the bottom of the mind.
And, well too often, this profound psychological wound leads to suicide.
When the survivor returns from years of mental exile, to finally take the witness stand, he or she often speaks with the artless skill of a severly abused child who has just blurted out some blatant fact of honesty.
It is the kind of honesty that catches people off guard, leaving them speechless.
The survivor exposes truth with such simplistic detail that becomes an indictment against all who had knowledge of war's real criminal intent.
The survivor's testimony can be so compelling it reveals the ultimate evidence: Lying Is The Most Powerful Weapon In War.
I was so filled with rage after returning from Vietnam that for the next twenty years I wanted to take every political hawk in America, and rub their faces in the reality of the Vietnam War, just like someone would rub a puppy's nose in the carpet after it wet on the floor.
The only difference is, the wet area on the carpet would be the blood of American teenage boys.
I would be brutally betrayed in Vietnam, and later would returned to an unfamiliar home in a coffin draped with deceit.
Deception so the corporate Godfathers of our country could fill their greedy coffers with enormous war profits.
As a medic in Vietnam, who saw American soldiers commit suicide in Vietnam, I had friends who took their own lives when they came home.
Once I understood this untouchable truth, I understood the lies.
I did not serve for the cause of freedom — I served Big Business Banking in America for the cause of profit.
Forty years ago before I entered the U.S. military, if someone had told me what I have just written these sentences, I would have told them they were a damn liar, and unpatriotic.
That was forty years ago, before I ever undetstood.
Mike Hastie
U.S. Army Medic
Vietnam 1970-71
February 9, 2009
The real horror of Iraq cannot be shown
“It is in the hearts and minds of loved ones
Of the loss of those they will never see again.”
BBC — Monday, 11 June 2007
US veterans 'high suicide risk'
US soldiers during the Vietnam War.
Vietnam war veterans were included in the survey
US war veterans are twice as likely to commit suicide than ordinary civilians, a study has found.
Researchers examined data on 320,890 men, of which a third served in the US military between 1917 and 1994.
Men who were white, better educated and older than the other men appeared to be at higher risk, as did those with a physical or emotional disability.
Researchers say the findings emphasise the need for mental health care for those serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The research, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, included men who had served in World War Two, the Vietnam war, the Korean War and the Gulf war.
'Inadequate screening'
It said the rate of suicide among men who had taken military service was 2.13 times higher than those who had never served in the armed forces.
War veterans were also twice as likely to use a firearm to kill themselves, it said.
Disabled veterans, or those who had experienced emotional or psychological trauma during their service were identified as the highest risk group.
Interestingly, overweight veterans were less likely to have committed suicide than those of normal weight, the study found.
Although the research did not include data from men returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, authors said the findings had strong implications for them.
Lead researcher Mark Kaplan, of Portland State University in Oregon, said doctors should "scrutinise veterans for signs of suicidal behaviour or thoughts and, if needed, they should intervene to make sure these patients do not have access to firearms".
He said in general "there is inadequate mental health screening, and many of the doctors outside the VA (Veterans Affairs) system are not trained to deal with these sorts of problems and don't have the time to treat them".
US Congress' Back yard
Arlington Northwest near Indian Island Weapons Depot
 
400 demonstrators march for peace on September 23, 2006	.

35 are arrested and jailed for civil disobedience, as the madness in Iraq continues.

After the demonstration, a wounded veteran solemnly walks through the grave markers of American soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

On the back of his T-shirt reads: 'In Bush's Back Yard.'

Photo: Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
Arlington Northwest near Indian Island Weapons Depot.
400 demonstrators march for peace on September 23, 2006 .
35 are arrested and jailed for civil disobedience, as the madness in Iraq continues.
After the demonstration, a wounded veteran solemnly walks through the grave markers of American soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan.
On the back of his T-shirt reads: 'In Bush's Back Yard.'
Mike Hastie
Vietnam Veteran
The connection between Vietnam and Iraq.
After Pat's Birthday
By KEVIN TILLMAN
It is Pat's birthday on November 6, and elections are the day after. It gets me thinking about a conversation I had with Pat before we joined the military.
He spoke about the risks with signing the papers.
How once we committed, we were at the mercy of the American leadership and the American people.
How we could be thrown in a direction not of our volition.
How fighting as a soldier would leave us without a voice... until we get out.
Much has happened since we handed over our voice: Somehow we were sent to invade a nation because it was a direct threat to the American people, or to the world, or harbored terrorists, or was involved in the September 11 attacks, or received weapons-grade uranium from Niger, or had mobile weapons labs, or WMD, or had a need to be liberated, or we needed to establish a democracy, or stop an insurgency, or stop a civil war we created that can't be called a civil war even though it is. Something like that.
Somehow America has become a country that projects everything that it is not and condemns everything that it is.
Somehow our elected leaders were subverting international law and humanity by setting up secret prisons around the world, secretly kidnapping people, secretly holding them indefinitely, secretly not charging them with anything, secretly torturing them.
Somehow that overt policy of torture became the fault of a few "bad apples" in the military.
Somehow back at home, support for the soldiers meant having a five-year-old kindergartener scribble a picture with crayons and send it overseas, or slapping stickers on cars, or lobbying Congress for an extra pad in a helmet.
It's interesting that a soldier on his third or fourth tour should care about a drawing from a five-year-old; or a faded sticker on a car as his friends die around him; or an extra pad in a helmet, as if it will protect him when an IED throws his vehicle 50 feet into the air as his body comes apart and his skin melts to the seat.
Somehow the more soldiers that die, the more legitimate the illegal invasion becomes.
Somehow American leadership, whose only credit is lying to its people and illegally invading a nation, has been allowed to steal the courage, virtue and honor of its soldiers on the ground.
Somehow those afraid to fight an illegal invasion decades ago are allowed to send soldiers to die for an illegal invasion they started.
Somehow faking character, virtue and strength is tolerated.
Somehow profiting from tragedy and horror is tolerated.
Somehow the death of tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of people is tolerated.
Somehow subversion of the Bill of Rights and The Constitution is tolerated.
Somehow suspension of Habeas Corpus is supposed to keep this country safe.
Somehow torture is tolerated.
Somehow lying is tolerated.
Somehow reason is being discarded for faith, dogma, and nonsense. Somehow American leadership managed to create a more dangerous world.
Somehow a narrative is more important than reality.
Somehow America has become a country that projects everything that it is not and condemns everything that it is.
Somehow the most reasonable, trusted and respected country in the world has become one of the most irrational, belligerent, feared, and distrusted countries in the world.
Somehow being politically informed, diligent, and skeptical has been replaced by apathy through active ignorance.
Somehow the same incompetent, narcissistic, virtueless, vacuous, malicious criminals are still in charge of this country.
Somehow this is tolerated.
Somehow nobody is accountable for this.
In a democracy, the policy of the leaders is the policy of the people.
So don't be shocked when our grandkids bury much of this generation as traitors to the nation, to the world and to humanity.
Most likely, they will come to know that "somehow" was nurtured by fear, insecurity and indifference, leaving the country vulnerable to unchecked, unchallenged parasites.
Luckily this country is still a democracy.
People still have a voice.
People still can take action.
It can start after Pat's birthday.
Brother and Friend of Pat Tillman,
Kevin Tillman
Death in Iraq
An Iraqi woman cries as U.S. troops raid the Iraqi city of Najaf, August 12, 2004.

U.S. Marines, backed by tanks and aircraft, seized the heart of the holy Iraqi city of Najaf Thursday in a major
assault on Shia resistance.

Picture: AP/Karim Kadim
An Iraqi woman cries as U.S. troops raid the Iraqi city of Najaf, August 12, 2004.
U.S. Marines, backed by tanks and aircraft, seized the heart of the holy Iraqi city of Najaf Thursday in a major assault on Shia resistance.
US soldiers committing suicide Afghanistan Iraq II
U.S. Soldier Killed Herself After Objecting to Interrogation Techniques
Private Gary Boswell, 20, from Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire, was found hanging in a playground in July
She is Jeanne "Linda" Michel, a Navy medic.   She came home last month to her husband and three kids ages 11, 5, and 4, delighted to be back in her suburban home of Clifton Park in upstate New York.   Two weeks after she got home, she shot and killed herself.
Peterson refused to participate in the torture after only two nights working in the unit known as the cage
     United States Numb to Iraq Troop Deaths       
     All papers relating to the interrogations have been destroyed     
      We stripped them and were supposed to mock them and degrade their manhood     
US soldiers committing suicide Iraq Vietnam
Unspeakable grief and horror
                        ...and the circus of deception continues...
— 2017
— 2016
— 2015
— 2014
— 2013
— 2012
— 2011
— 2010
— 2009
— 2008
— 2007
— 2006
— 2005
— 2004
— 2003
Circus of Torture   2003 — now
He says, "You are quite mad, Kewe"
And of course I am.
Why, I don't believe any of it — not the bloody body, not the bloody mind, not even the bloody Universe, or is it bloody multiverse.
"It's all illusion," I say.   "Don't you know, my lad, my lassie.   The game!   The game, me girl, me boy!   Takes on interest, don't you know.   T'is me sport, till doest find a better!"
Pssssst — but all this stuff is happening down here
Let's change it!
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